JENNIFER CROUCH
Art-science practitioner and researcher
CV

Selected works:
  1. Drawings
  2. Paintings
  3. Textiles
  4. Ceramics
  5. Prints
  6. Workshops


“Recorporealising MRI Data” PhD artwork:
  1. MRI: physics and data
  2. Phantoms
  3. Art object as scientific device
  4. Weaving patterns
  5. Yarn wrappings // lab maps 
  6. Body-loom assemblage
  7. Woven-work
  8. Research maps
  9. Painted cartographies


Workshops, exhibitions & public engagement:
  1. Membranes
  2. Public engagement of science /Art-Science Workshops
  3. Synthetic Biology workshops
  4. The Clearing: A project from the future
  5. Reitir
  6. Arctic Circle Residency
  7. Jiggling Atoms
  8. Invisible Structures
  9. Books


Other work:
  1. Embroidery symbols
  2. Geology paintings
  3. The Moss Crest Project
  4. Flatland paintings
  5. The Magic Calendar
  6. Probability
  7. Dissecting Room Drawings
  8. Other ceramics
  9. Radio Club
  10. Sunk Season
  11. Epecuen (mural/installation)
  12. A Vague Inventory of Ailments and States



Biography —
Info
  1. Dr. Jennifer Crouch is an art-science practitioner working in sculpture, textiles, drawing, installation and painting. They have a background in physics and medical illustration and experience working as an artist in scientific laboratories, on expeditions in the Arctic Circle, with communities, and as part of local and international art projects. 
  2. Jennifer has guest lectured at universities across the UK and Europe, teaches textile arts at Morley College London, is fashion lead at NewVic FE College, and is an associate lecturer on the MA in Art and Science at Central Saint Martins, London. 
  3. They have published books on popular science and anatomical art. 
  4. Jennifer is a queer slug and keen gardener interested in liminality, composting, LBGTQ culture & experiences, textiles, kink, magic and the absurdity of the cosmos.

Mark

Art object as scientific device



LE / 1957
From The Immense Journey

            A billion years have gone into the making of that eye; the water and the salt and the vapors of the sun have built it; things that squirmed in the tide silts have devised it. Light-year beyond light-year, deep beyond deep, the mind may rove by means of it, hanging above the bottomless and surveying impartially the state of matter in the white-dwarf suns.




LE / 1957
From The Immense Journey

            A billion years have gone into the making of that eye; the water and the salt and the vapors of the sun have built it; things that squirmed in the tide silts have devised it. Light-year beyond light-year, deep beyond deep, the mind may rove by means of it, hanging above the bottomless and surveying impartially the state of matter in the white-dwarf suns.




Yet whenever I see a frog’s eye low in the water warily ogling the shoreward landscape, I always think inconsequentially of those twiddling mechanical eyes that mankind manipulates nightly from a thousand observatories. Someday, with a telescopic lens an acre in extent, we are going to see something not to out liking, some looming shape outside there across the great pond of space.
            Whenever I catch a frog’s eye I am aware of this, but I do not find it depressing. I stand quite still and try hard not to move or lift a hand since it would only frighten him. And standing thus it finally comes to me that this is the most enormous extension of vision of which life is capable: the projection of itself into other lives. This is the lonely magnificent power of humanity. It is, far more than any spatial adventure, the supreme epitome of the reaching out.






LE / 1957
From The Immense Journey

            A billion years have gone into the making of that eye; the water and the salt and the vapors of the sun have built it; things that squirmed in the tide silts have devised it. Light-year beyond light-year, deep beyond deep, the mind may rove by means of it, hanging above the bottomless and surveying impartially the state of matter in the white-dwarf suns.




Mark