JENNIFER CROUCH
Art-science practitioner and researcher
CV

Selected works:
  1. Drawings
  2. Paintings
  3. Textiles
  4. Ceramics
  5. Prints
  6. Workshops


“Recorporealising MRI Data” PhD artwork:
  1. MRI: physics and data
  2. Phantoms
  3. Art object as scientific device
  4. Weaving patterns
  5. Yarn wrappings // lab maps 
  6. Body-loom assemblage
  7. Woven-work
  8. Research maps
  9. Painted cartographies


Workshops, exhibitions & public engagement:
  1. Membranes
  2. Public engagement of science /Art-Science Workshops
  3. Synthetic Biology workshops
  4. The Clearing: A project from the future
  5. Reitir
  6. Arctic Circle Residency
  7. Jiggling Atoms
  8. Invisible Structures
  9. Books


Other work:
  1. Embroidery symbols
  2. Geology paintings
  3. The Moss Crest Project
  4. Flatland paintings
  5. The Magic Calendar
  6. Probability
  7. Dissecting Room Drawings
  8. Other ceramics
  9. Radio Club
  10. Sunk Season
  11. Epecuen (mural/installation)
  12. A Vague Inventory of Ailments and States



Biography —
Info
  1. Dr. Jennifer Crouch is an art-science practitioner working in sculpture, textiles, drawing, installation and painting. They have a background in physics and medical illustration and experience working as an artist in scientific laboratories, on expeditions in the Arctic Circle, with communities, and as part of local and international art projects. 
  2. Jennifer has guest lectured at universities across the UK and Europe, teaches textile arts at Morley College London, is fashion lead at NewVic FE College, and is an associate lecturer on the MA in Art and Science at Central Saint Martins, London. 
  3. They have published books on popular science and anatomical art. 
  4. Jennifer is a queer slug and keen gardener interested in liminality, composting, LBGTQ culture & experiences, textiles, kink, magic and the absurdity of the cosmos.

Mark




Art-Science Practitioner and Researcher — Knowing through the body and through matter



“Profuse strains of unpremeditated art.”
(Shelley)
                 Terminology is annoying because not everyone knows what you are talking about, but when you need to talk about something really specific it is helpful.

Here the sculptor has made no concessions; no attempts to curry favor with curators or collectors — pieces wholly outside discourse. And if pressed for an affiliate movement for these “sculptures” (i.e. Cubism, Mannerism, etc.)… perhaps Monism or Cosmogonism? Definitely not Conceptualism or Pataphysics — Actualism?

The analog? Well for sure it is 1:1. Weird; yes — a knot to be admired for it’s curves — not for untying. An emergent surface as thick as it’s mass. 
 
Were it possible for the instances of our minds or world events to be mapped and dimensionally materialized, something similar to a rock would appear — areas of smoothness yielding to pockmarked particularities, density shifts and feathered explosions. What really is the shape of a boom town? A pilgrim’s journey? A section of jungle mayhem? A boring era? The silhouette of a father’s cold slap? The contours of a brief, intense friendship? Comfortably we perceive all of these things as ready to be integrated into ledgers or novels or timelines; but really they are queer crags and striations of unimaginable idiosyncrasy.

So yes, the reflective, reasonable yield of our mind has much symmetry (computation, cataloguing, narrativizing, etc.) but it’s actual shape is no shape, but unfolding chaos and singularity visible only to our particular time-scale. Our species-wide symmetries and quantizations are basically improvisations white-labeled onto directionless infinitude attempting the constant creation of navigable Dimension.

So, look intimately at a rock, walk around it, get up close to it, savor it’s complexion and composition as you would any painting or temple and see it as the faultless mirror that it is — a truly perfect sculpture.



ABSTRACTION AND EMPIRICAL ILLUSTRATION
We live our lives made up of a great quantity of isolated instants. So as to be lost at the heart of a multitude of things. (From the Double Dream of Spring, 1970.)




  1. Gavrilo Princip’s last grocery list written
  2. The time that alligator ate that fish
  3. When the Yongzheng Emperor found that weird dust bunny under his throne
  4. The great earthquake of Alexandria
  1. The invention of expectation in literature
  2. When the heaviest cacao fruit fell in Takalik Abaj
  3. Animesh eats his first Fly Agaric mushroom